Sunday, September 19, 2010

Wow!

Two highlights from the papal visit that gave me the shivers (good shivers!) ...


1. Pope Benedict speaking about Thomas More in Westminster Hall, the very building where the trial of St. Thomas took place:
As I speak to you in this historic setting, I think of the countless men and women down the centuries who have played their part in the momentous events that have taken place within these walls and have shaped the lives of many generations of Britons, and others besides.

In particular, I recall the figure of Saint Thomas More, the great English scholar and statesman, who is admired by believers and non-believers alike for the integrity with which he followed his conscience, even at the cost of displeasing the sovereign whose 'good servant' he was, because he chose to serve God first.

The dilemma which faced More in those difficult times, the perennial question of the relationship between what is owed to Caesar and what is owed to God, allows me the opportunity to reflect with you briefly on the proper place of religious belief within the political process. ...
Oh. My. Goodness. That is something to set every historical gene I possess quivering. How the world has turned. In the time of Blessed John Henry Newman (another wow!) it would have been unimaginable that a Pope could speak at Westminster. Even fifty years ago it would have benn unthinkable.

2. As a Catholic married to a Jew, this image says it all:

4 comments:

Clare@ BattlementsOfRubies said...

Yes, it has been a momentous and extraordinary few days.
I watched that meeting in the Waldegrave room and was so touched by the warmth between the Holy Father and Dr Sacks, who has made a strong impression on me. A very dignified and thoughtful man.

Melanie B said...

Wow! That gives me shivers too. Thanks for sharing. I haven't really been following the papal visit; but I will probably be going back and reading some of the coverage this week.

Karen E. said...

Wow, indeed! Beautiful.

Linds said...

It has been an amazing few days, hasn't it. Secular Britain? I think not. And everyone is talking about it too, which is wonderful!